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the interest rates mdogñ$'&b7>q. housing sjxsna1prices cbequall >> one ú9tz lch ~;jvñeducation is always going Òhas hard. to different things. we need a diversity of approaches in the education, if last thing we should do Ñ"o nationalize education from a department out of washington. one size doesn't fit all in education. washington doesn't know best. we should get rid of federal education department and not because it's too expensive because we care so much and we are paying right now to harm our children, we should stop. >> afghanistan, do you see an end in sight? >> we went in to afghanistan, we were justified in to going in to afghanistan because they refused to bring osama bin laden to justice for his role in the 9/11 attacks. osama bin laden is dead. there is no further reason for us to be in afghanistan. we should bring the troops home as soon as we can. let the living get on with their lives. >> health care, this is a big issue right now. obama has hung his head on this, romney says he will appeal it. what are your thoughts. >> if we want health care to be affordable and availa
in the side of the pakistani taliban. she defied them by campaigning for better education for girls and openly criticized the extremists. where she lives, girls were long forbidden from going to school. islamic militants battled the government for control over the region for years. many admire how malala spoke out against talibani rule. >> we pray for her and that others can embrace her views. >> women's protests have been gaining momentum in morocco as well. the fate of a teenage girl has galvanized support for an end to forced marriage. the girl was 15 when she was raped by a man 10 years her senior, so her family could save face, they marry her off to the rapist. she later killed herself with rat poison. >> he had to marry her. people were talking badly about my daughter. she lost her honor. no one would have taken her. >> moroccan law allows a rapist to avoid jail if he marries his victim. for the man, it is a way out. for her, it was a death sentence. >> to talk more about this, i am joined by the head of planned international germany, one of the world's oldest children's development orga
-old girl simply because she wanted an education. because she wanted an education for herself and other girls like her. we will update you on her medical condition and bring you the latest from pakistan. buying this juicer online was unbelievable. what a bargain! [ female announcer ] sometimes a good deal turns out to be not such a good deal. but bounty gives you value you can see. in this lab demo, one sheet of bounty leaves this surface cleaner than two sheets of the leading ordinary brand. so you can clean this mess with half as many sheets. bounty has trap and lock technology to soak up big spills and lock them in. why use more when you can use less? bounty. the clean picker upper. and these come together, one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and
about teachers and our future with education and you think about law enforcement and safety on the streets. we think about firefighters and things that we have had to do. we have not responded to doubt where would we be and what would have happened if we hadn't have done the things that would get the environment going again, the manufacturing of automobiles and general motors? >> moderator: you mentioned roads and bridges but what would you favor and how would you pay for his? boswell well i think we are going to have to raise the tax. i think we must do that and it will be indexed inflation but we have talked about that before. that is not new information for you. we talked about in the transportation infrastructure committee sometime ago. it was made between mr. young and mr. oberstar who talked to president bush at the time and he said he would veto it so that did not happen. we have got to do it. >> moderator: congressman boswell, believe you support president obama's stand that would raise taxes on people who make over $250,000 a year, is that correct? boswell: that's c
. it was a wet based initially. we have phone numbers for reporting graffiti. we have educational training online as well. and last year we began doing what we call city greets, getting cities together to share what's working, not working in their communities. even though cities are next to each other, they hadn't shared ideas. we formed an advisory meeting and haven't missed one meeting since. [speaker not understood] graffiti conference in 2013 in san francisco. very proud to be part of. >> thank you, mr. lindner. did read your application, was very impressed. especially someone who is not a resident here in san francisco -- >>> i come here at least twice a month. >> keep coming. >> we appreciate your commitment and dedication here in san francisco. i just have to say that what is listed at least on the graffiti advisory board for the seat that you have applied is you must be a property owner here in san francisco. so, we'll be asking questions about that requirement, being that you don't fit that requirement. >>> sure. my understanding was there is a possibility of a waiver, but what i wanted
. [applause] >> help people rise, to help britain rise there is a third crucial thing we have to do. educate all our children. and i mean really educate them. not just pump up the grades each year. in math, and science come in reading we have fallen behind. not just behind germany and canada, but behind estonia and australia, to. this is britain's real school board and it reads, must do better. now you've heard of pushy parents, al blowing their way to a better education for their children. this is a pushy government. and my approach is very, very simple. i've got two children in primary school, and i want for your children what i want for my. to go to schools where discipline is strict, where expectations are high, and where no excuses are accepted for failure. and i don't want great schools just a be the preserve of those that can pay the fees or by the nice house, i want those schools to be open to every child in every neighborhood. and the reason i know that every child can go to a school like this is because with this government, more and more new ones are opening. now, you've heard fro
mechanisms. >> and let me plug that into another analogy, or just an insight into religion and education - may have used it, may not, but here, we'll use it again. education and religion - educational institutions are at the same time institutions of stability and control. at the same time, educational institutions are foundations for innovation, for transcendence - knowledge is an extraordinary power. and that's why we have these colleges and universities, so that people like me and my administrative buddies upstairs can control this very dangerous process. religion is exactly the same way - it's an enormous power. and so we ritually, we have this instinct, as you're bringing out, janet, is there's an instinct to want to use it to control and to have stability at the same time, just as knowledge is always going to create a transcendence it has to if it's real - the creation and extending of knowledge, which we ideally do at a university, is powerful stuff. well, the same thing in religion. let me jump onto these notes and then we'll get to you, barbara, because i want to do my civil rel
of pharmaceutical drugs such as education on minimizing intake, revamp of the fda process or streamlining the drug companies' procedures instead of just finding more money to pay for them? >> well, that's a great question. i think one of the problems we have, particularly for seniors, is there is no prescription drug coverage in medicare. and therefore, when they have to try to purchase drugs they do so on their own, there's no kind of collective bargaining, no power of purchasing among seniors. so i think step one to make sure prescription drugs is more affordable for seniors, and those are the folks who really rely upon prescription drugs a lot these days, is to reform the medicare system, is to have prescription drugs as an integral part of medicare once and for all. the problem we have today is like the patient's bill of rights, particularly with health care, there's a lot of bickering in washington, d.c. it's kind of like a political issue as opposed to a people issue. so what i want to do is i want to call upon republicans and democrats to forget all the arguing and finger pointing, and come
such as education on minimizing intake, revamp of the fda process or streamlining the drug companies' procedures instd of just finding more money to pay for them? >> well, that's a great question. i think one of the problems we have, particularly for seniors, is there is no prescription drug coverage in medicare. and therefore, when they have to try to purchase drugshey do so on their own, there's no kind of collective bargaining, no power of purchasing among seniors. so i think step one to make sure prescription drugs is more affordable for seniors, and those are the folks who really rely upon prescription drugs a lot these days, is to reform the medicare system, is to have prescription drugs as an integral part of medicare once and for all. the problem we have today is like the patient's bill of rights, particularly with health care, there's a lot of bickering in washington, d.c. it's kind of like a political issue as opposed to a people issue. so what i want to do is i want to call upon republicans and democrats to forget all the arguing and finger pointing, and come together and take care of
held that there is no more affirmative action in higher education after 2028? >> no, i don't. >> was that the holding of grutter? >> i agree it might, but i want to get to the question, see what i'm trying to pinpoint, because we have such a limited time. and to me, the one thing i want to pinpoint, since you're arguing on that this satisfies grutter if properly understood, as you say that. in looking up, we have a two- court rule. and two courts have found, it seems to me. that here there is a certain -- there is no quota. it is individualized. it is time limited. it was adopted after the consideration of race-neutral means. each applicant receives individual consideration, and race did not become the predominant factor. so i take those as a given. and then i want to know what precisely it is that grutter required in your opinion that makes this different from grutter, in that it was not satisfied here? the ones i listed two courts say are the same. so maybe there's some others. >> i am not sure we agree with those courts. >> we have a rule that two courts say it, we are r
these to transition to enforcement. as much as we educate and campaign and talk, there is still a role for enforcement. we've been working with the police department and your agency to focus on smart enforcement. the police surely don't have enough resources to be everywhere every minute. where do you put your energy. we think you should be putting your energy here. if we know these 20 intersections -- they're not all intersections, 20 locations are the worst and the most problematic, are where most people get hurt and should height vulnerable road users, people walking and biking, are 30 times more likely to be hurt at one of these intersections. if we know these are the problem, let's put our enforcement efforts there. i would be happe happy to go there and put our materials out. i would like to see the police department and the m.t.a. efforts focused on these locations. i would like to see you all coming back on an annual basis reporting, and letting them know how it goes. we know these are problem intersections, might will be a problem with the makeup of the street? possibly see. i'd love to see a
, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help
the educational mission. for example, they will look for admissions that play against racial stereotypes just by what they bring. the african-american fencer. the hispanic who has mastered classical greek. they can also look for people with a demonstrated track record. >> if you have two applicants absolutely the same in every respect, they both come from affluent back grounds, well educated parents, one falls within two of the groups that are given a preference, the other doesn't, it is a marginal case. the last position available in the class. under the texas plan, one gets in, one doesn't get in. do you agree with that or not? >> no. >> you agree that's an incorrect statement of the facts or you agree that that's an incorrect understanding of the equal protection clause? >> i think it is both. there is no automatic preference in texas. i think this is -- it is page 398-a of the joint appendix. they describe the process saying an applicant's race is considered only to the view that the applicant's race will contribute to the broader view -- >> but the two applicants are entirely the same in
. marriage, work, and family forced her to a delay hurt education. at the age of 40, she was told that she was one course short. her daughter cost for the college to recognize a mother's love for lifelong learning with the letter. her case was reviewed and they found she had enough credits to graduate. >> a good education but you in good stead. my education was used the times are raised the family. >> she proudly displays her diploma. san jose even backdated it to 1959. the baltimore running festival is in the record books. still ahead, our wrap up of the annual events. >> chilly, but a nice day to day. changes are coming. eventually the rain will come down in the weather plus [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i need your help... i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. well...everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe well...i'm not at liberty to give that out, but we do use tender chunks of white meat chicken in an herb & spice broth. come on that's it? i need the recipe. you gotta help
is possible there. >> former secretary of state condoleezza rice recently called education the civil rights struggle of our day. do you agree with that assessment and how do you address it. >> i believe that education is a big problem, but the problem is in the that there's too little government in education but much too much. we need to allow the free market to provide things like voucher programs, charter schools and allow bad teachers to be fired and good teachers to be rewarded. >> what do we do with afghanistan? what's the end game? >> this has not been clear what the end game of the current administration are a last administration will be in the middle east but what we should really do is march the troops out as quickly has we marched them in. >> is the healthcare reform act the answer. mitt romney said he will refeel immediately. so what is your stance. >> the healthcare has a lot of good intenses but it's not going to accomplish those goals it. create as bigger government bureaucracy and it tries to reduce prices by initiating price controls and those things don't work. what we real
to succeed and i want our school to be giving our kids the kind of education they need for the jobs of tomorrow. that means we have to put our kids first and parents first and teachers first. the teachers union will have to go behind. [cheers and applause] number 4, you will not get business people to risk their life savings to start a small business or big companies to come to america, built a big factory, hire americans if they think we are on the road to greece. if we keep spending more than we taken, that is where we're heading. we will cap federal spending and get us back on track to a balanced budget. [cheers and applause] number 5, number 5 is this -- we are going to champion small business. we're going to help small business people build their businesses. to do that, we will keep their taxes down and get regulations to encourage growth and take that big cloud of obama care of small business. we're going to help small business in america. [cheers and applause] we do those five things and 12 million jobs grow in america and take home pay starts going up again. do you realize u
. deductions for health care costs, educational write off. that's where the biggest pot of money is. since the romney team won't say that's where they're going -- when you talk about historic tax reduction, you can't compare the deep reductions from the kennedy era when we had 96% marginal tax rates and dropping those significantly and in the reagan era where you had a significant steep cut in the marginal tax rate, then you compare that with the clinton era where we increased marginal tax rates and had the longest sustained period of accelerated economic growth in our recent history. you can't compare. >> as interesting as all this is. this went over the head of 60% of the public out there. they would need an economics class to understand what's going on. this go goes to the core point. if you don't understand basic economics, this doesn't make any sense to you. you won't learn this from a debate. that's where the challenge is from. >> my favorite thing on taking things that i don't understand and making them clear. on the blog fact check he talks about this $5 trillion question and the f
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. yeah... think they made a mistake?s. i don't know - maybe. the fried cheese melt is back for just 4 bucks. 1 of 4 big 4-dollar meals on the 2-4-6-8 value menu. only at denny's. open all night. most paints have color that sits on the surface. but nothing beats benjamin moore's color lock technology that locks color right in, no matter how often you wash it. color lock technology. exclusively from your benjamin moore retailer. find your perfect color with a buy one, get one pint offer. visit benjaminmoore.com/promo. . >>> san francisco's board of supervisors will decide if the sheriff gets to keep his job. he pled guilty to a charge from a fight stemming from a fight with his wife. he was found guilty of official misconduct. tuesday will be the first time since 1932 the board will vote on removing an el
and decision makers in education of our children 84% of respondents on the survey agreed to this statement. agreed or strongly agreed to this statement. you can clap. [applause] okay. i am coming to my last two slides, so you can have a sigh of relief from numbers and how did sfusd perform compared to other school districts in california and how do you think we did? okay. so as you can see we are -- when we say we're one of the highest performing districts here is the performance of all the other districts. we just took a sample of five others as well as the state so the state is at 57% proficiency and we are at 61%. last year to this year the state moved from 54 to 57 and we moved from 57 to 61. 60.5 percent rounded was 61%. csd map -- again this is grades two through 11. you will see that the state is at 52%. we're at 57% proficiency. their growth was 50 to 52%. ours was 56 to 57%. and with that i am going to turn it back to -- what was the reason? the cause? the validity behind these, the best practices. >> thank you. so in looking how our sites performed overall, our sch
, these kids are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
emphasis on informed participation. in light of that we had planned and continue to plan a robust education and notification to customers about this program. that involves paid media, partnering with community-based organizations to make sure we are really talking through folks who have contacts within the communities. and it is a community engagement program. we expect to be partnering with other city departments, including the department of environment as we embark on this education and notification program. you will see on the consent agenda, 8c has us procuring additional resources through a contract so we will have an extensive outreach program. i wanted to also take a moment to remind the commission of the steps that we had been asked to -- conditions rather, we had been asked to meet prior to launching the program. these are simply the conditions that you had articulated us to meet in the resolution you approved in advance of going to the board of supervisors for approval. so this is a quick summary of those conditions. i can say that -- i can give you a quick status on each of those
class does not have its taxes go up and making sure that we invest in education and infrastructure and innovation. the alternative choice that has been presented is that we should lower taxes for millionaires and billionaires and in order to pay for that, we have to turn medicare into a voucher program. we have to get investments in education and innovation, research and development, border security, diplomatic security. that is not the right answer. that is not the right approach. we have tried it. it did not work. we should not go back. >> [inaudible] and the former regional security officer have both suggested there were efforts from the u.s. embassy in libya to have more security at the state department. state department officials would not let it happen. why? why would the state department not listen to these men on the ground in libya who wanted more security? >> as i said, there is no question that the results of what happened in benghazi is not acceptable. four americans killed is not an acceptable situation, and that is what the president moved so quickly to ensure that an
, for the first time since the attack. she was gunned down by the taliban for supporting education for girls. nbc's correspondent has more. >>> after that attack -- she has moved her hand and feet for the first time since the attack. we're told movements were slight. a sign of improvement. and they came as a result, and the doctor's decision to redo's the amount of medicine she was receiving. >> she is still on a ventilator. we reduced her sedation today to carry out a better clen cal assessment by the neurosurgeon. >> that have been keeping her unconscious to allow her bed to heal. they say her vitals are normal. she was shifted to the military hospital days ago because it is more secure and has a special pediatric care unit. the military has been holding regular briefings for the media because the interest levelen her recovery has been so high. not just national media, but international as well. well today they were able to deliver their first piece of concrete encouraging news with more they hope in the days ahead. >>> we also have an update now on the hero dog from the philippines. take a loo
local taliban edict and campaigned for the reist girls to an education. >> if you can help us in our education, so, please, help us. >> reporter: that put her on the taliban hit list. the extremists have threatened to come and shoot malala again if she survives. you can protect her? >> yeah, surely. you know, the state will do their best to protect her. she is a symbol of hope. she's, you know, a beacon of light for all the girls of this country. we would love to protect every malala of this country. >> reporter: that's the first tall order for pakistan security forces. the second will be to arrest malala's attackers. the police have detained and then released several people over the past few days, but so far, not the man who actually pulled the trigger. elizabeth palmer, cbs news, islamabad. >> axelrod: tensions continue to rise between neighbors turkey and syria. syria flexed the muscles today by moving tanks and troops to its border with turkey and by banning turkish airline flights over its territory. earlier this week, turkey intercepted a syrian plane, a move syria called air p
door-to- door to educate voters on the issues. >> you go out there, they say, oh, this is important, and i think it's really effective. >> reporter: the republicans are employ employing the same strategy. >> it's a matter of seeing what's on tv, and in the mail, and then that direct contact brings it all home. >> reporter: we spoke with a lot of people out are on the street who have not yet made up their minds. >> there's a lot more investigating to do. >> i'm still reading some of the propositions. >> reporter: but most people we spoke with don't. >> i think it's actually really rude, and bad when people are trying to sway us. it's a really personal opinion, and i think everyone is entitled to that. >> i feel like i'm intelligent enough and that i can make up my own mind. >> reporter: still door-to- door campaigning won't end anytime soon. >> in the final analysis, it does improve turnout, and so for now we're stuck with this system, we'll see what the future holds. >> both president obama and mitt romney spent the day rallying voters in key battleground states. they are making
. minorities against their new homeland. the same war that makes the educated american man working 70 hours per week your in and year out to accomplish something in his five feel as if he is presented. a war of christian values have no place in this world. that no culture is better than any other. one set of values, one model worth. the war that encourages, foster's, harbors and empowers radical islam. more whose casualty will ultimately be the western world, marked by words. our war is with these people as much as it is it with those extremism from the events of september 11. america is the one hope for the world. the only shield, the only hedge of protection. the one bloodline to make sure that no enemy can cross. it has the model, the values, the culture, the freedom and constitution. america is a conservative idea in a sea of socialism. america's values are conservative. america favors the individual. e. pluribus unum. israel to palestine and christianity man with the rest of the world only the ex the government employee that was found on the opposite premise. the same conservative values a
education and access to a quality education for all of america's citizens and public broadcasting has been an agency and part of the machinery that has delivered quality education at no cost to the public for many, many years. >> bill: when you say at no cost to the public, it's $450 million a year. that's a lot of taxpayer cost. but let me just ask you this: i like pbs programming especially for kids. you did a nice job for a long time on that and it was very educational. the sesame workshop, which is the big driver on pbstv, their assets, according to the irs 2011 filing, $356 billion. that's what the sesame workshop is worth. so i'm going to submit to you, mr. burton, that they can compete in the free marketplace like cartoon channel and others because we're in an era where we have to bring down the spending. of two do it. and you say? >> i say you're missing the point, bill. if you're going to focus on the $414 million, you are missing the point. america has always claimed to be the nation that wants to provide a quality education to all of its citizens. and i'm not saying that pbs i
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
community education with s.a.f.e. and others. did you have questions, supervisor olague? >> no. i can imagine this is an issue that occurs in other areas, i know. i'm just wondering if you have received many complaints from other groups. you know, i know in chinatown they are obviously targeted but is it uncommon in other neighborhoods? >> absolutely. several of these cases have occurred in sunset, the richmond. >> i'm wondering if other ethnic groups are targeted for something similar. that is what i'm asking. i was actually approached about ten years ago in a similar manner, so i imagine it is something that occurs. of course that was one random incident. >>> this particular scam tends to deal on an asian suspicion. there is a lotto scam prevalent now. it is whatever the flavor of the day. whatever they think they can get away with, they will do. >> and as supervisor mar mentioned, i think it is important to work with some of the senior groups right now to inform seniors of this. maybe they are the most vulnerable people that are targeted. i imagine it occurs in all age groups. >> a
the opportunity to do so. we've done a lot around education with the school district, educating kids about graffiti, how graffiti affects property owners, it affects the city. and things we've done, we've worked with the art commission. i think one of the funest things i was involved in was at that time deputy director nuru of dpw and i worked with the arts commission on what color the street furniture and lamp poles in san francisco should be and standardize that nice green color we have now and made it easier to paint out graffiti and keep a standard. so, dpw didn't have to carry around 10 different colors of paint with them to paint out graffiti. so, going forward what i'd really like to see is just really more education, more education, education with kids, with property owners around their responsibilities, with folks that get caught doing vandalism and grab feet and also education with the arts -- on avenues for people to express their creativity and that kind of thing. so. >> thank you, mr. giusti. i've seen you at many events. i appreciate your work and passion and for serving sinc
know. with that being said, it's vitally important that those parents still have a say in the education of their children. i would certainly support and promote voting by those parents in school board elections in san francisco. by implication own a community college election would fit in that rubric, to support college advancement to people who have traditionally been put at the margins of our society. in those two elections, i think, are the most fundamental in the sense that they go to the root of advancement in this country and the obtaining of the american dream. so the school board and community college board i would certainly support that. >> thank you, miss olague. >> i don't think there is much to add to that. i know a couple of years ago there was a ballot measure that failed. so i would totally support bringing this back and allowing people to reconsider it. because as mr. everett said, i think it is important for people, especially those who have children in the school district and also students at the city college level to be able to weigh in on those types of questions.
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
an education. i think that that's an important part of being a parent. i -- if the question -- if you're -- maybe i get it wrong. are you suggesting that if somebody has means that the national doesn't affect them? >> well, what i'm saying --- >> i'm not sure i get it. help me with the question and i'll try to answer it. >> well, i've had friends that have been laid off from jobs. i know people who cannot afford to pay the mortgage on their homes; they're car payment. i have personal problems with the national debt. but how has it affected you? and if you have no experience in it, how can you help us if you don't know what we're feeling? >> i think she means more the recession, the economic problems today the country faces rather than the deficit. >> well, you ought to -- you ought to be in the white house for a day and hear what i hear and see what i see and read the mail i read and touch the people that i touch from time to time. i was in the lomax a.m.e. church. it's a black church just outside of washington, d.c. and i read in the -- in the bulletin about teen-age pregnancies, abo
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
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the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
. they have no need to do that. there is nothing more potent as a driver of education for those with less skill than a taught labor market and the need to hire. i would suggest to you that those who assert that slow growth and stimulus and what happens in the short run is the short run issue, what is most important is the concept of long run fundamentalss this the crucial point -- miss the crucial point. we are by allowing the economy remains stagnant committing grievous structural sins. we are squandering human capital as people withdraw from the labour force. we are missing opportunities for employment and training for workers in their most formative years. we are running an active set of measures that discourage investment in finding the most disadvantaged workers and we are providing limitations on the incentive to invests in research and development as a product of tomorrow. how then to think about our current situation and the strategy for moving forward? it is i think right to say that in a sense we have moved past the great recession. the economy was, as i said at the time, like a
find a way to get where they're going. but if take you away early childhood education... slash k-12 funding... and cut college aid for middle class families ... they won't go far. yet that's exactly what mitt romney wants to do... ...to pay for a $250,000 tax break for multi-millionaires. if mitt romney wins, the middle class loses. priorities usa action is responsible for the content of this advertising. under the president's policies, middle income americans have been buried. they're just being crushed. middle-income americans have seen their income come down by $4,300. this is a tax in and of itself. i'll call it the economy tax. i'm not going to raise taxes on anyone. my plan is to bring down rates to get more people working. my priority is putting people back to work in america. i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >>> welcome back, everybody, somebody is really anxious to give you the weather. that commercial break lasted way too long. >> i'm always anxious because i enjoy bringing people good news. >> we hardly ever bring good news around here. >> we can control that j
immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scholarships, they got wired. when you know this and you do not talk about it and do not do anything about it, this is another recipe for disaster. our public education system is just really got to be strained out. the teachers' unions are primarily concerned about how much they make a year, and that is not where the concern has to be. it is making sure that children have the funds in education that are needed for education. >> we spend double per person to educate k through 12, double other nations. we do the same thi
's a footnote in the book. she was very learned. she was very proud of her education at the university of wisconsin. with his father and mother were wisconsin nurse. they really haven't traveled far at all and they were very, very middle-class folks in the depression. and the father is a paper salesman had gotten through high school. he actually lost the family house. he was the breadwinner and in 1939 who sold the action and mystery book call it little suburb of milwaukee. it was sold for the death of a sonic, which is $77,000. see the family had been kinder through some very dire straits. they were also very conservative. they were america firsters, which meant they didn't want america to be in world war ii. they were against the new deal and franklin roosevelt, they were very, very conservative household. where that conservatives and came, who knows except that it was pretty common when a string may be searched, pretty common, commonly found in that suburb at that time, the folks i interviewed told me. when someone was going into the army, just to jump up a little bit on the last na
, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. this is actually about jobs and economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming
will be better off. i have a different view. i think we have to invest in education and training. i think it's important for us to develop new sources of energy, here in america, that we change our tax code to make sure that we are helping small businesses and companies that are investing here in the united states. that we take some of the money we are saving as we wind down two wars, to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately will be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess? or do we embrace a new economic patriot. >> that says america does best when the middle-class does best. i am alonging ford that debate. >> reporter: governor romney, two minutes. >> thank you, jim. it's an honor to be here with you. and it's an honor to be here with the president. i appreciate the welcome of the university of denver and the presidential commission on these debates. congratulations to you, mr. presid
diverse campus provides a better education. that was the court's holding. after the argument today it seems clear the court is not going to go and overrule that precedent but the problem many of the justices had is how do you know when you have enough diversity. the university of texas has an unusual system. it automatically admits anybody who graduates in the top 10% academically of any high school in texas. that gets a fair amount of diversity on campus because many of those schools tend to be racially more uniform, predominantly black or hispanic and tend to get diversity. the problem for perhaps the majority of the justices how do you know when there's enough diversity. what the school says is, we don't want merely diversity in numbers. we want african-american students who are interested in fencing and speaking greek and studying architecture and hispanic students who are great fencers or ballet dancers. we want diversity in other words within the mere racial numbers. and i think for a majority of the court the question is how do you know when you're there, how do you know whe
of talking about our educational system, instead of talking about educational and pell grants. >> incarceration rates. >> all the opportunity ladders, all of these barriers, racial discrimination employment. there's a whole lot of things they could have talked about instead and i think it's really important is that we not fall for it. that african merges have to say this is not it it. i'm sorry. we're better than that. we're capable of having professional jobs, all kinds of jobs. this is a very, very, very detrimental ad. >> can i talk about this for a second? when we look at the history of the 20th century, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles,
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
-million dollar grant to modernize journalism education in afghanistan. update's lexy nuno reports. ">>>it is only their second time to the united states...and these afghan professors are enjoying the simple things in life. nat sound: "white mocha" simple things like drinking coffee...taking pictures... walking around san jose state's campus...and learning about modern journalism. they say it's a different picture than back home where journalists fear for their lives. ahamd zia ferozpur, a journalism lecturer at balkh university, says he's suprised at all the possibilites for students. (ahmad zia ferozpur/journalism lecturer at balkh university): "there are a lot of opportunities for students. they practice their journalism skills and they have radio, television, newspapers, and they have websites." the editor in chief of an afghan magazine says students in afghanistan face extreme lack of materials, like computers or even books. one of the other challenges is for afghan women--who sit on a different side of the room as men--wanting to go into journalism proffessions. in afghan society men and wom
to ban a blessing. both of these are opposed not only by your running mate but just about every education in the country. now that you are mr. mondale's running mate, had to change your position on either of those? >> both mondale and i agree on the same goal, that is not discrimination. i just did not agree on the same direction he does on how to achieve it. i do not find any problem with that. that is something that has been handled by the court and not by him or congress. but we both support nondiscrimination and have seen and integration of neighborhoods as the goals we have set forth. i represented a district in queens that is 70% catholic. let me say as well i have been a supporter of public schools, education. that is something we feel very strongly about for the future of the country. this administration over the past several years has gutted the educational programs available to our young people. it has attempted to knock out pell grants, which is money to young individuals who are poor and cannot afford to go to college. it is reduced by 25% the amount of money going into colleg
overburdens in regulation and cuts spending one penny of every dollar. it focuses on education to make sure we are empowering our workforce for the jobs that are available. lastly, it develops a comprehensive energy plan so we can put people back to work while we are protecting our economy and being an energy independent. i spend time developing my plan. you have no plan. i think the people of connecticut want to know what we're going to do for them. >> mr. murphy, you have 30 seconds. >> linda mcmahon should stop spreading these stories. it's not ok to make up these stories when you're running for the senate. my work is based in the work of debt and public service and focusing tax cuts on the middle- class, not by focusing tax cuts on the affluent and rich. my focus is on rebuilding the education system, not divesting from funding the most important services to our states. they're big differences in are planted as we should be talking about. >> is the public being well served by the quality and nature of this campaign? we are here today in a formal debate and youtube are probably going to ans
of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restore the principles of the american founding. he is the intellectual muscle of that mission. he teaches in two of the programs. the program and the lincoln fellow program. most important, he is the editor of the claremont review books, the quarterly publication of the claremont institute. perhaps you are famili
at this customer outreach and education campaign as a way to make sure we are signing up the right folks who really want the program. but yes, we have done our homework to see if there is an appetite. this map shows you the results of that effort. >> i have seen all those studies. may i have the map up again, please. still on the board, we have overhead, please? thank you. okay. you are saying the panhandle -- >> the dark green. >> so you see gray area. >> the dark green is over on the bay side. >> yes. >> and by candlestick, you are saying. excuse me. at&t park. >> yes. >> i don't like it when we lose to -- >> you see in district six and district nine and district eight, some in 2. quite a bit of green area. those are areas, those precincts we are proposing to target initially. with preenrollment for the phase i target we are hoping to really touch folks and have them saying -- expressing their level of interest in advance of coming out with the state required opt-out portion of the education and notification. >> i'm confused about one, which is the panhandle. to me that is blue. is that really gr
with affirmative action. it's not just the education community watching this case. as sylvia hall reports, so are some of the nation's biggest companies. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the university of texas. >> reporter: that's abigail fisher, who was denied a spot in the school's 2008 freshman class. u.t. says race wasn't a factor, but fisher maintains she was rejected because she's white. that accusation could change the way colleges have picked their students for decades. by state law, three quarters of u.t.'s students are accepted automatically, because they are in the top 10% of their high school classes. the rest go through what the university calls a holistic review, considering factors, like grades, essays, personal experiences and race. even fewer students got in that way in 2008, when fisher didn't make the cut. >> there are going to be certain financial consequences to this young lady because she could not attend the school of her preference. as u.t. says, it is critical within texas to be a u.t. graduate. s
are spending on year for education whereas someone is educated and having a job there they are not going to go to jail, it is very unlikely. so i would say that there might be something like determinive sentencing which would allow someone who is drug addiction and you could provide the judge with the discretion to actually have them in treatment rather than costing the tax payers thousands of dollars. so we have to save the seniors the services that they need and we have to be willing to make hard reform. >> now we come to the candidate' closing statements if you are not registered to vote, please do so right away and urge your friends and family to register stao. the deadline is october 22nd. if you have moved you need to register again with the new address, if you have changed your name you need to register again with the new name. all right. so we will do the closing statements in reverse, alphabetical order and please remember that you have tr two minutes >> thank you for organizing our decision and thank you for showing up. >> i am running because we don't need people in sacramento to t
. and this was a really good education today. she was approved by the full board and i don't know when the swearing-in will be, but if we could manage to get here in by the next meeting she will be one of you and you will help her along as she gets to the all the materials she has to read. they will be finishing up commissioner cavalini's term. so at the end of this fiscal year, she will have to be re-appointed or not, depending on the case. so help her along and say hello and i don't know if she would like to come up and say a few words? >> welcome. >> it's been great to be here and i really appreciate all of the support i have gotten from folks. and i'm looking forward to working with the commission. i also have to use the restroom, [ laughter ] [ laughter ] so i will be brief. >> actually you have seen a long-running meeting, which isn't usual. >> police, do you have anything? >> oh, my gosh, he is still here. >> he is here at time and a half. [ laughter ] >> good evening commissioner staff, steve mathias from mission statement. i will run down the incidents running in the central distri
'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> from the cbs 5 weather center good evening. high temperatures across the bay area. unseasonably cool for this time of year. 62 degrees in san francisco to 77 in sonoma. it's a live weather camera looking out towards the marine layer. streaming across the coastal areas. will be pushing on shore tonight. current air temperature stands from 74 degrees in redwood city. low 70s at this hour in liver more with westerly at 15. santa rosa is 70. low 60s in san francisco. another view this time looking out towards the bay. 66 degrees in oakland and alameda. your forecast tonight partly cloudy in overnight. sunset officially at 6:42. lots of clear skies. otherwise tomorrow, we'll continue that thing with the partly cloudy conditions. does call for a chance of a shower in the forecast. we'll pinpoint that. tonight, overnight, 40s
. borrowing not to invest in schools, in hospitals, transport and education. but borrowing to keep people idle. so the next time you hear a conservative say to you labour would increase borrowing, just remember it is this government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we've seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. people think that's what were promised. now look there will be some people who say, and this is an important argument, they'll be some people who say, well there is short-term pain but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see that the longer you have low growth in our country the bigger the debt hole becomes for the future and the bigger our problems will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work that is not just bad for their prospects now; it is bad for their prospects for the whole of the rest of their lives. and if a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get back up and running again during the recovery. so when david cameron says to you, well let
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
passod tuesday. throughout those efforts we are also developing our kuft education and noteification program. we never intended to have goch you customers who were surprised to find us as the power provider under this program. we heard from the board and the mayor loud and clear that is a very key issue for you as policy makers as our policy guides, so we are incorporating more elements into that program and will be coming back to you and to the commission with that program proposal in draft form and get feedback to get that target. on the commission meeting of october ninth of next week -- the week after next, excuse me. we will present ou commission with an opportunity to award the contract for developing that program. we conducted a competitive bidding process to select a bidder, to select a counter party to develop that marketing and outreach program for us, and the commission will be asked to authorize us to sign a contract and begin that work. the rate fairness board meeting of october 12 is just one of the near term notice ones. we will have three or four more before we
in this country. i grew up in new orleans. we believe that education is the key. we all need to sit at the table. i do not believe in segregation for inmates. they need to tear that barrier down and put people together, no matter what. when we go inside the walls of san quentin, it is not just black inmates. it is hispanic, pacific islanders, white, native americans, it is everybody. when they leave that room, they go back to their communities that are segregated. they, too, do not like it. it is a barrier that has to be torn down. i know it works. being in there for the last four years, we make it a point that everybody mixes up, even the seating. you do not just sit with a black person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and c
not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management person
heard fissured the university of texas at austin, the affirmative action policies in higher education. abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas at austin in 2008. fischer sued, arguing that racial minorities with worse credentials were accepted ahead of her because she was white. she contend that the schools use of of race in nations violates the u.s. constitution's guarantee of equal protection. a previous court ruling allows race to be one factor considered to achieve diversity. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> well, i get to say that this is case of love and 345, fisher of the of texas at austin. and you get to say -- >> general suter trained me too well. chief justice and members of the court, may i please the court. the essential issue here is whether the university of texas at austin and can carry its burden of proving that its use of race as an nation plus factor and the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of equal protection clause to abigail fisher met the two test of strict scrutiny, which are applicable. >> before we ge
to a world of education that offered me a new insight into how i saw the world. so, i just wanted to do that for somebody else, that's all. >> reporter: out of thousands of applicants, oprah hand-picked 72 girls. >> do you think i'm good enough to be selected to go to the school? >> i think that you are. good enough. >> reporter: girls from shanty towns. >> 65 million living together in the yard. >> the house that i live in with my mom is very small. >> reporter: girls who experienced trauma and the hardships ingrained in poverty. girls a lot like a young oprah winfrey. >> at the time that i grew up in mississippi, it was very much like south africa. it was apartheid mississippi. it was. and segregated schools, no running water, no electricity. which was just the way, you don't think, oh, gee, everybody else has it and i don't. that's just the way i grew up. it's amazing that i've come from that to my own ipad. >> reporter: the girls and their families understood the life-altering gift of education. >> you will be a part of the very first class of the oprah winfrey -- >> reporter: in a
.a.f.e. plays a major role in the office and educational forum, programs in this scam series. however, s.a.f.e. also do another one, is educating the younger generation. that means middle-aged parents. there are still a lot of centers who don't go to community centers. they may be illiterate, may not have access to televisions because the -- grandchildren actually use the television, so they are out of touch with the world. these are very vulnerable targets. ones that step out on the street alone. so we want people to go back and tell the elderly parents, particularly the elderly asian woman parent to be aware of this kind of scam. everybody say that this is something recent. actually this is not. this is century old scam generated from the fear of ancient belief in supernatural power. when i was a kid my grandmother tell me a lot of stories. at that moment you receive this kind of story and it really stays in the memory. if there's anyone who came to you and telling you something will happen to you because some evil thing is attached on your body, they will strike fear. you overwhemingl
into our education institutions if i am strongly in favor of proposition 30 and 38. >> the battle lines have been drawn between prop 30 and 3. less than a month until election day, the state school's chief there is weighing in on two very similar but competing ballot measures and why votes need to pass. a grim discovery south of the bay area, what investigators found after a standoff that lasted for hours. >>> if you are just joining us, good evening. welcome back. i am diane dwyer. giants' fever in the bay area. the team prepares for plateothe playoff against st. louis. we are joined now from at & t park. monte, tickets are a touch hard to come by? >> well, diane, that's right. there are tickets available you. cannot get them here at the giants' box office. you have to go online. as you guessed that will cost you. i heard from communications manager at stubhub, and there are 4,000 tickets aavailable on site for tomorrow's game at at & t park. tickets start at $120 each. those are for standing room tickets. if you want to sit down you will have to pay $140. and on the higher end, good s
? >> reporter: it seems one thing most people can agree on is that public funding or public education desperately needs funding. how to get it? that's where the controversy comes in. let's take a closer look at what each measure is. prop 30 is a 7-year plan. it would raise income tax for californians making $250,000 or more a year. by 3%. it would also raise the sales tax by a quarter percent. the money would be used to fund k-12 and higher education. public safety programs and the remainor hoping to balance the state budget. prop 38 backed by civil rights attorney molly must knower will last 12 years and increase personal income taxes on a sliding scale. the money would be almost exclusively used for k-12 education. >> if you peel back the rhetoric. if you strip away the arguments, they're not that much different. the only difference is that the initiative lasts for a shorter period of time and it does not raise the income taxes of everyone. whereas munger's will last for a longer period of time and will raise taxes on almost everyone in california. >>> as the election nears, the sup
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